100 more wind turbines headed for Northern Illinois

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Invenergy plans to construct about 100 turbines for a 250 MW rating, and related infrastructure across more than 100 parcels in Chenoa, Gridley, Lawndale, Lexington and Money Creek townships, according to county records. A permit application says, “The project will likely commence construction in 2018 or 2019 with the goal of being operational in 2019 or 2020.”

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