A Glance At Australia’s Renewable Energy Space

| June 11, 2019

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With the International Energy Agency (IEA) anticipating a rise in world electricity demand by 70 per cent by 2040, the requirement for clean and inexhaustible sources of energy has arisen. The renewable energies neither produce greenhouse gases nor polluting emissions. Such energies are created using renewable sources like hydro, wind, solar, landfill gas, etc. Australia is continuously making efforts to assess and increase the use of renewable energy in the generation of electricity, in the form of thermal energy and fuel in transport. Australia’s Renewable Energy Association, Clean Energy Council is committed to transforming Australia’s energy system to one that is cleaner and smarter.

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