A guide to the energy of the Earth - Joshua M. Sneideman

| June 30, 2014

article image
Energy is neither created nor destroyed — and yet the global demand for it continues to increase. But where does energy come from, and where does it go? Joshua M. Sneideman examines the many ways in which energy cycles through our planet, from the sun to our food chain to electricity and beyond.

Spotlight

Bioenergy del Principado SA

Within the ERPASA group, for ten years, BIOENERGY has formed the division of renewable energies. During this development, BIOENERGY has become a leader and a reference point for renewable energies in both the national and international markets.

OTHER ARTICLES

A Clean Energy Source of the Future?

Article | March 27, 2020

You know things are getting exciting when German bureaucrats are turning emotional, as happened one month ago in Berlin: “Hydrogen is the shit! And we need it desperately.” Thomas Herdan, the bureaucrat in question, is a prominent policymaker in the German Economic Ministry and, until that moment, was known for analytical thoughtfulness rather than for enthusiastic outcries. His excitement, however, is shared by governments and businesses around the world. The International Energy Agency IEA estimates that every year, the world’s governments pour $700 million into R&D for hydrogen applications alone. A few months ago, the U.S. announced $40 million in funding for 29 hydrogen projects across the country. As IEA puts it, hydrogen currently has “unprecedented political and business momentum”.

Read More

Why Renewable Energy Is a Technical Reality But An Economic Disaster

Article | March 27, 2020

2020 may turn out to be the year of the battery. The Trump administration has made grid-level battery backup a focus of its Energy Storage Grand Challenge -- an effort to create an all-American supply chain for advanced battery technologies. Meanwhile, Texas, which is the only state to run its own electricity grid, is offering up to $9000 a megawatt-hour for peak summer battery power. And on the other side of the world in South Australia, Tesla has been asked to up the capacity of its mammoth battery in the desert to 193.5 megawatt-hours, or about double the storage capacity of the entire Texas state grid.

Read More

Recognizing and solving challenges in renewable energy land usage

Article | March 27, 2020

As anyone familiar with the saga of the Spotsylvania solar project knows, an inherent difficulty in developing renewable energy projects comes in finding the right project location, both in terms of size and siting. This is one of the topics analyzed in a new report released by The Brookings Institute: “Renewables, land use, and local opposition in the United States.” It’s a hard fact that renewable generation uses more land than fossil fuel systems, with solar having slightly lower median land use than both on- and offshore-wind, despite a large variance in total land density values. While this presents an issue for renewable developers, the silver lining is that renewable energy can be sustained indefinitely on the same land base, while mines and wells will eventually run out. As a solution, the study recommends greater development on brownfields, as well as floating PV, though the authors do recognize the capped potential of floating PV at around 10% of current U.S. electricity generation.

Read More

10 ways coronavirus is changing energy and climate change

Article | March 27, 2020

The various impacts are occurring both now and into the future. Most changes don’t bode well for acting on climate change and transitioning to cleaner energy. Global carbon dioxide emissions are likely to drop this year, due to the global economy faltering. That’s not a silver lining to the novel coronavirus. It’s like a person who loses weight while sick. It’s a byproduct of a bad situation and by definition should and will not last. Indeed, since the Industrial Revolution, the world’s emissions have not gone down except briefly during economic crises. These incidents merely show how difficult it is to reduce emissions in an economically sustainable way.

Read More

Spotlight

Bioenergy del Principado SA

Within the ERPASA group, for ten years, BIOENERGY has formed the division of renewable energies. During this development, BIOENERGY has become a leader and a reference point for renewable energies in both the national and international markets.

Events