Activity report for Energy Community Renewable Energy Coordination Group

N/A | June 28, 2017

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Article 14 of Directive 2009/28/EC requires that the Contracting Parties, with the participation of local and regional authorities, shall develop suitable information, awareness-raising, guidance or training programs in order to inform citizens of the benefits and practicalities of developing and using energy from renewable sources. In order to achieve this objective, the Contracting Parties need to ensure that citizens and communities can effectively participate in the energy system not just on the demand side but also in the production of energy and other areas which must be aligned with the de-carbonization agenda to allow new actors and new approaches including innovative business models, to compete on a level playing field with existing incumbents.

Spotlight

Cairo Solar

Since 2014, Cairo Solar co. succeeded in designing, procuring and installing 43 projects for a total of about 1.5MWp solar plants, with a 90% corporate re-order rate. Currently Cairo solar is providing its services successfully to different types of customers such as corporate entities, government entities and home owners.

OTHER ARTICLES

Outdated perceptions: how energy attitudes are damaging customer wallets

Article | March 22, 2021

Despite rising energy costs and dwindling customer ratings of the ‘Big Six’, over 37% of Brits still believe they are getting a good deal when it comes to gas and electricity. Here, Keith Bastian, CEO of rising independent Outfox the Market, challenges those age-old perceptions that are damaging consumer bank balances… I have never quite understood the notion of pay more for the same service. Except that last part, is really where the difference lies. As I have made my way through the energy market, it seems clear to me that we are facing a common notion. Age-old dinosaurs, that have relied on name status and brand power to retain customer loyalty, despite not providing anything different or any value-added service, give the impression that customers are somehow safer with them. That is the biggest misconception. We at Outfox the Market would like to challenge that. Of course, when I speak in such a way, I am referring to the ‘Big Six’, those long-established brands whose share in the energy market whilst substantial, is increasingly coming at the cost to its customers. For example, in the latest independent customer rankings from Which, it was determined that the traditional big energy companies had some of the lowest scores for customer service and value for money, yet some customers still feel secure with them. On the contrary, rising independents, such as ourselves, were scoring highly in these areas and this is where I feel the difference lies. Regardless of your opinion on fossil fuels and/or renewables, it is more the value of looking after your customers, understanding their concerns and dealing with them efficiently that has become somewhat lost for the ‘Big Six’. It is true that they have a larger proportion of customers to serve with a larger workforce, but that should not be to the detriment to the service they provide. What were are seeing now, as evidenced by the recent Ofgem price hikes, is the ‘Big Six’ once again failing consumers in these areas, with most of the top names putting costs up by £96 a year on average as of April. I am not one to not acknowledge that energy firms are tongue-tied in some respects in passing regulated costs on; there are times when we must. However, customers could also benefit from a little research. Even with growing numbers of consumers switching, nearly 60% of all households in the UK are still on standard variable rate tariffs, those that are subject to the incoming Ofgem hikes. So, the real question is why aren’t more customers switching? Heritage, loyalty and brand association. These facets really should not come at cost of paying more for energy. I really believe it is down to time-sensitivity and a misunderstanding around the barriers to switching, with cost somewhere in the middle. According to MoneySuperMarket, 75% of us would switch if we could save £149.99. A hefty figure, but why not the £96 highlighted earlier? That is still pretty good, and something that would add up nicely over the years. I understand we are time-poor as a nation, it’s well publicised, but we’re all well averse in switching phone contracts and insurance deals, so why not where our energy comes from? Truth be told, I believe it’s an age-old notion that energy is ‘just something that comes with the house, not worth the hours or hassle to change.’ But in all honesty, it takes a matter of seconds to switch. Firms such as ourselves offer this and more via a quick and easy quote online. Best of all, many energy providers will help manage the switching process for you, contacting your current provider and notifying them of your intentions. I would also like to challenge this notion that once an energy firm ‘gets you’, you are ‘locked in’ for years upon end in ever rising contract costs. If you are on a standard variable tariff, you can switch to a new provider at any time. What’s more, even if you are in a fixed term energy deal, which can be subject to exit fees, sometimes the cost involved outweighs the savings you can make with your new provider. Customers must do their best to ask more of energy firms, check the service they are being given and hold it up against national bill averages. Compare what your neighbours, friends and family are paying under similar living circumstances, and weigh up if you are being given a fair deal. Living costs and regulated price hikes are always going to be an ever present worry, so I call on both customers and energy firms to do their due diligence in these respects. Age-old energy firms relying on their reputation must take a serious inward look at their lessening market share to understand why they are failing customers. It’s time to make a change now, both from business attitude and a consumer standpoint; switching is quick, easy and a vital notion to bear in mind, as both retaining custom and saving money becomes an ever-growing sticking point in the energy market.

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Is solar or wind a better way to power your home?

Article | March 22, 2021

A growing number of homeowners in the United States are turning to renewable energy sources to provide power for their homes. Solar power systems only need sunlight to power your home and vehicle, recharge large battery systems, and still allow you to sell extra energy to your utility company. Wind power can perform the same functions by producing energy from wind-powered turbines. Both depend on often volatile forces of nature, but overall, solar panels provide more consistent energy. Solar panels don't include moving components, as wind production units do. These and other differences play important roles in deciding which renewable energy option is best for you.

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Is nuclear power the energy of the future?

Article | March 22, 2021

It’s been nine years to the day since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster: one of the worst nuclear accidents in history. This brings up memories of Chernobyl and other nuclear accidents that have played a part in the opposition to nuclear energy. However, there is still a debate on the merits and drawbacks. There are those who see it as a path forward to getting off of fossil fuels while others maintain that not only does nuclear energy pollute, but other risks are taken by developing this type of energy. This debate has been going on for decades since the birth of the atomic bomb. Yet, due to the threat of climate change, is nuclear power a viable option moving forward?

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How Project Modeling Can Energize the Community Solar Market

Article | March 22, 2021

Community solar programs have the potential to greatly expand the market for solar energy and make the benefits of solar more accessible. However, growth of this sector is currently inhibited by uncertainty in project delivery costs. We sat down with Dr. Joseph Goodman of the Rocky Mountain Institute to understand this challenge—and how detailed design modeling capabilities can help overcome this barrier.

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Spotlight

Cairo Solar

Since 2014, Cairo Solar co. succeeded in designing, procuring and installing 43 projects for a total of about 1.5MWp solar plants, with a 90% corporate re-order rate. Currently Cairo solar is providing its services successfully to different types of customers such as corporate entities, government entities and home owners.

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