An uncertain future for green energy in Canada

FIONA MORROW | May 29, 2019

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In the time between setting her panel title for the CBA Environmental, Energy and Resources Law Summit in Vancouver and standing to introduce it earlier this month, moderator Sarah Powell felt it necessary to add a question mark, presenting it on the day as: Canada’s Green Energy Shifts West?If recent changes in provincial politics have injected that note of uncertainty, Powell, from Toronto’s Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP, pointed out there were some unassailable facts that remain: in 2018, natural gas production in Canada edged out coal for the first time; renewables will be the fastest-growing energy industries over the next five years; and, as renewables become more cost-effective, we will see a large and rapid expansion.Bonnie Hiltz, VP Energy and Environment Practice at Sussex Strategy Group, said that while climate change is likely to be a key distinguisher in this year’s federal election, at the provincial level, the stakes are different.

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