Black plastics could create renewable energy

| July 24, 2019

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Research from Swansea University has found how plastics commonly found in food packaging can be recycled to create new materials like wires for electricity - and could help to reduce the amount of plastic waste in the future. While a small proportion of the hundreds of types of plastics can be recycled by conventional technology, researchers found that there are other things that can be done to reuse plastics after they've served their original purpose. The research, published in The Journal for Carbon Research, focuses on chemical recycling which uses the constituent elements of the plastic to make new materials. For more information see the IDTechEx report on Graphene, 2D Materials and Carbon Nanotubes: Markets, Technologies and Opportunities 2019-2029.

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Our Oceans Challenge

In 2014 Our Oceans Challenge (OOC) established a vibrant community of entrepeneurs, offshore experts, scientists and individuals who developed innovative solutions for a sustainable use of our oceans. In 2016, OOC is back for the second cycle! OOC provides an online co-creation platform for entrepreneurs, offshore experts, scientists and those who care for the oceans to share and enrich ideas for a sustainable offshore industry.

OTHER ARTICLES

Is nuclear power the energy of the future?

Article | March 11, 2020

It’s been nine years to the day since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster: one of the worst nuclear accidents in history. This brings up memories of Chernobyl and other nuclear accidents that have played a part in the opposition to nuclear energy. However, there is still a debate on the merits and drawbacks. There are those who see it as a path forward to getting off of fossil fuels while others maintain that not only does nuclear energy pollute, but other risks are taken by developing this type of energy. This debate has been going on for decades since the birth of the atomic bomb. Yet, due to the threat of climate change, is nuclear power a viable option moving forward?

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Recognizing and solving challenges in renewable energy land usage

Article | March 11, 2020

As anyone familiar with the saga of the Spotsylvania solar project knows, an inherent difficulty in developing renewable energy projects comes in finding the right project location, both in terms of size and siting. This is one of the topics analyzed in a new report released by The Brookings Institute: “Renewables, land use, and local opposition in the United States.” It’s a hard fact that renewable generation uses more land than fossil fuel systems, with solar having slightly lower median land use than both on- and offshore-wind, despite a large variance in total land density values. While this presents an issue for renewable developers, the silver lining is that renewable energy can be sustained indefinitely on the same land base, while mines and wells will eventually run out. As a solution, the study recommends greater development on brownfields, as well as floating PV, though the authors do recognize the capped potential of floating PV at around 10% of current U.S. electricity generation.

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SOLAR+STORAGE

ClearVue Solar Glass Greenhouse Officially Opened

Article | March 11, 2020

A high-tech greenhouse comprised mainly of solar glass generating electricity to help run it was officially opened yesterday in Western Australia. ClearVue Technologies Limited’s solar glass involves a nanoparticle interlayer and spectral-selective coating on the rear external surface that enables 70% of natural light to pass through while redirecting infrared and UV light converted to infrared to the edge where it is harvested by solar cells. ClearVue says each 1m2 of its window product is currently rated to generate 30 watts-peak of electric power, but also mentions a new-generation product with the proven ability to generate 40 watts peak per m2 to be available sometime this year.

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Renewable Energy Could Power the World by 2050

Article | March 11, 2020

Virtually all the world’s demand for electricity to run transport and to heat and cool homes and offices, as well as to provide the power demanded by industry, could be met by renewable energy by mid-century. This is the consensus of 47 peer-reviewed research papers from 13 independent groups with a total of 91 authors that have been brought together by Stanford University in California. Some of the papers take a broad sweep across the world, adding together the potential for each technology to see if individual countries or whole regions could survive on renewables.

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Spotlight

Our Oceans Challenge

In 2014 Our Oceans Challenge (OOC) established a vibrant community of entrepeneurs, offshore experts, scientists and individuals who developed innovative solutions for a sustainable use of our oceans. In 2016, OOC is back for the second cycle! OOC provides an online co-creation platform for entrepreneurs, offshore experts, scientists and those who care for the oceans to share and enrich ideas for a sustainable offshore industry.

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