Building local economic resilience though democratic local energy models

| February 28, 2018

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When the energy supply chain is localised, local jobs can be created, energy spend can be kept in the local economy and community benefit funds can be created and reinvested locally to reduce community vulnerability and to create a more resilient financial system. However, changes in national support for renewable energy projects have made it very difficult for community energy groups to deliver projects. This project has researched, developed and shared practical new business models for community energy groups to provide them with the support that they need to adapt to the changes in government policy.

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Renewable Energy Co-operative

R-ECO's teams of engineers provide solar photo-voltaic (PV), solar thermal, ground source heat pumps and biomass heating systems for domestic, commercial and public customers throughout the south and south west of England.

OTHER ARTICLES

How smart solar inverters can save you money

Article | March 4, 2020

Traditionally, home solar inverters have had just one key function in support of your home solar installation: They convert the direct current moving out of your solar panels to alternating current your home appliances use. Over the past decade, inverter technology has advanced to add enhanced capabilities like data monitoring, communication, and executive functioning. In these ways, inverters have absolutely become more intelligent. These smarts don’t just help prevent blackouts, they can also save you a significant amount of cash over time. In this article, we introduce you to three ways a smart inverter can save you money: smart charging, standby mode and home energy monitoring.

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Recognizing and solving challenges in renewable energy land usage

Article | March 4, 2020

As anyone familiar with the saga of the Spotsylvania solar project knows, an inherent difficulty in developing renewable energy projects comes in finding the right project location, both in terms of size and siting. This is one of the topics analyzed in a new report released by The Brookings Institute: “Renewables, land use, and local opposition in the United States.” It’s a hard fact that renewable generation uses more land than fossil fuel systems, with solar having slightly lower median land use than both on- and offshore-wind, despite a large variance in total land density values. While this presents an issue for renewable developers, the silver lining is that renewable energy can be sustained indefinitely on the same land base, while mines and wells will eventually run out. As a solution, the study recommends greater development on brownfields, as well as floating PV, though the authors do recognize the capped potential of floating PV at around 10% of current U.S. electricity generation.

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8 Reasons Why Right Now Is A Great Time To Go Solar

Article | March 4, 2020

The impacts of the coronavirus COVID-19 are being increasingly felt throughout the country, but the usual bills – including electricity bills – keep rolling in. There’s a lot that really sucks financially-speaking at the moment, but there are some bright spots. Here’s why now is a particularly good time to be considering going solar. But there’s a sure-fire way to get a great return on your cash and that is acquiring a good quality, professionally installed solar power system. Try our new solar calculator – the estimated payback and returns might make your eyes pop. For example, the following are estimated simple payback periods and savings over ten years for a 6.6kW solar system costing $6,600 installed in the various capitals; using the calculator’s default settings:

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Major Sustainability Impact via Renewable Power

Article | March 4, 2020

Globally, there is increased interest and investment in sustainable forms of energy via commercialized renewable power technologies such as solar (thermal and photovoltaics), wind, biomass, geothermal, and other viable sources that are at the center stage. As part of the definitive pathways towards de-carbonization, investors, lenders, market players, and policymakers are increasingly becoming aware of the need for flexibility in the energy value and supply chain. This key area is a critical market segment wherein renewable power technologies are expected to play an important role in both front of-the-meter (FTM) and behind-the-meter (BTM) applications. Accordingly, renewable power is an attractive option to power generators, process plants, commercial and industrial (C&I), institutional, and residential facilities in reducing overall carbon footprint.

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Spotlight

Renewable Energy Co-operative

R-ECO's teams of engineers provide solar photo-voltaic (PV), solar thermal, ground source heat pumps and biomass heating systems for domestic, commercial and public customers throughout the south and south west of England.

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