Can Technology Drive Sustainability?

| September 2, 2019

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Fortunately, demand for sustainable technology is providing incentives to organizations working on a host of new technologies that promise to create a more sustainable future. Here are some of the technologies under heavy development to keep an eye on. Carbon dioxide has been identified as the primary culprit of climate change, and it’s a common byproduct of electrical generation and transportation. At least one company, Newlight Technologies, aims to turn carbon dioxide from a waste product into a sustainable source of plastic through its AirCarbon biopolymer. Carbon itself is a valuable element, and it’s the primary component of the polymers used in plastic. Being able to convert carbon waste from coal and natural gas power plants into a useful resource could play a role in cutting the rise of carbon in the atmosphere, and AirCarbon has been described as both carbon-neutral and carbon negative; that is, it removes more carbon from the environment than it produces.

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Enercon GmbH

The company founded in 1984, a graduate engineer Aloys Wobben started the economical and ecological success story of ENERCON. A small team of engineers developed the first E-15/16 with 55 kW nominal power.

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Spotlight

Enercon GmbH

The company founded in 1984, a graduate engineer Aloys Wobben started the economical and ecological success story of ENERCON. A small team of engineers developed the first E-15/16 with 55 kW nominal power.

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