Clean energy gets greener as battery technology gets better

| November 18, 2019

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Blackouts could be a thing of the past as battery technology improves. This is also essential in making green energy resilient. This year, as Pacific Gas & Electric has cut power to millions of people in an effort to prevent wildfires for individual homes and communities. But if more batteries were considered, fewer areas would need to be cut off from the main generation stations. Batteries are being considered as a tool in wildfire prevention and are seen as a key to significantly reducing the emissions that drive climate change. When demand peaks during hot, stagnant weather in the summer, clean energy sourced by the wind can power those air conditioning units! This extra energy can also reduce electricity bills for customers who choose to sell their power back to the grid when energy prices are highest.

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We work with Australia’s largest energy users to increase energy productivity and manage exposure to energy price risk. Our team of over 30 specialist energy efficiency engineers will work with you from initial investigation through to project commissioning.

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