COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION AND CALIFORNIA’S CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE

N/A | June 12, 2018

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California continues to exercise national and global leadership in rapidly decarbonizing its economy to mitigate the environmental impacts of fossil fuels. At the same time, there is a growing trend by local governments to adopt Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) as the means to exercise greater local decision-making on energy matters. Today there is much uncertainty and miscommunication among California stakeholders as to whether and to what extent the decisions made by CCAs will align with and support or possibly diverge from the state’s energy and environmental goals. On the other hand, stakeholders are actively considering whether and to what extent the state’s energy and environmental policies help or hinder CCA contributions toward those goals.

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