Concentrated Solar Power Market Key Players Acciona S.A., GDF SUEZ, kyFuel

HIREN SAMANI | June 6, 2018

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Concentrated solar power (CSP) is also called as concentrated solar thermal. Solar energy can be used to create electricity in two separate ways. First is solar concentrators and the second is photovoltaic systems. Concentrated solar power is a technology that generates electricity by concentrating solar energy in the main point. It is used to focus sunlight. The concentrated solar power plant generates electric power uses mirrors to concentrate the large area of sunlight onto a small area and also focus the sun’s energy. CSP can also provide combined power and heat, particularly in desalinization plants. Concentrated solar power technologies subsist in five general types, such as parabolic trough, enclosed trough, concentrating linear Fresnel reflector, dish Stirling, and solar power tower.

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Harness Energy, LLC

Harness Energy is a leading provider of meteorological measurement field services to renewable energy developers and operators worldwide. Specializing in meteorological tower installation, we have serviced measurement sites in over 30 states, including both Hawaii and Alaska, as well as internationally. We install, commission, maintain and manage the equipment needed to collect high quality data.

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How Much Solar Does My Business Really Need?

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Recognizing and solving challenges in renewable energy land usage

Article | March 12, 2020

As anyone familiar with the saga of the Spotsylvania solar project knows, an inherent difficulty in developing renewable energy projects comes in finding the right project location, both in terms of size and siting. This is one of the topics analyzed in a new report released by The Brookings Institute: “Renewables, land use, and local opposition in the United States.” It’s a hard fact that renewable generation uses more land than fossil fuel systems, with solar having slightly lower median land use than both on- and offshore-wind, despite a large variance in total land density values. While this presents an issue for renewable developers, the silver lining is that renewable energy can be sustained indefinitely on the same land base, while mines and wells will eventually run out. As a solution, the study recommends greater development on brownfields, as well as floating PV, though the authors do recognize the capped potential of floating PV at around 10% of current U.S. electricity generation.

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The Key to Unlocking 100% Renewables

Article | March 12, 2020

The 100 percent renewable energy future doesn’t start with a country, state or region. It starts with a city. One power plant in a city, in fact. In Glendale, California. Glendale is a city of 200,000 people just north of Los Angeles. And in 2014, Glendale was in a tricky spot. The city’s natural-gas plant was old. The City Council faced a decision that would impact the municipality for decades to come: revamp the 252-megawatt gas plant or find local alternatives?

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How heat can be used to store renewable energy

Article | March 12, 2020

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Spotlight

Harness Energy, LLC

Harness Energy is a leading provider of meteorological measurement field services to renewable energy developers and operators worldwide. Specializing in meteorological tower installation, we have serviced measurement sites in over 30 states, including both Hawaii and Alaska, as well as internationally. We install, commission, maintain and manage the equipment needed to collect high quality data.

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