CORONAVIRUS CRISIS FAST-FORWARDS GREEN ENERGY 10 YEARS INTO THE FUTURE

| April 6, 2020

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As businesses shut down and many work from home around the world, electricity demand has reduced in COVID-19 hotspots. This could have a knock-on effect for the renewable sector. China, where the outbreak first took hold, is the world’s biggest electricity consumer. Output from factories has been substantially diminished with many unable to return to their jobs in manufacturing. Due to the curtailing of industrial electricity use, cuts in energy consumption for 2020 could be equivalent to the power used by the whole of Chile, according to IHS Markit. In Europe, peak power consumption has also gone down. Italy, Spain, and the UK have all seen an average 10 per cent drop in energy usage with bars, restaurants, offices and factories, which remain closed as social distancing measures continue.

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World Wind Energy Association

WWEA is an international non-profit association embracing the wind sector worldwide, with more than 600 members in around 100 countries. WWEA works for the promotion and worldwide deployment of wind energy technology.

OTHER ARTICLES

Recognizing and solving challenges in renewable energy land usage

Article | February 14, 2020

As anyone familiar with the saga of the Spotsylvania solar project knows, an inherent difficulty in developing renewable energy projects comes in finding the right project location, both in terms of size and siting. This is one of the topics analyzed in a new report released by The Brookings Institute: “Renewables, land use, and local opposition in the United States.” It’s a hard fact that renewable generation uses more land than fossil fuel systems, with solar having slightly lower median land use than both on- and offshore-wind, despite a large variance in total land density values. While this presents an issue for renewable developers, the silver lining is that renewable energy can be sustained indefinitely on the same land base, while mines and wells will eventually run out. As a solution, the study recommends greater development on brownfields, as well as floating PV, though the authors do recognize the capped potential of floating PV at around 10% of current U.S. electricity generation.

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More Solar Ready To Help Power Pumping For SA Water

Article | April 29, 2021

SA Water’s electricity supply is about to become greener and cheaper again with the addition of another major solar power system, and an even bigger installation to soon follow. The utility says more 7,300 solar panels installed at the second pump station on its pipeline between Swan Reach and Stockwell are now connected and ready to go. “The Swan Reach to Stockwell Pipeline spans across more than 50 kilometres inland from the mighty Murray across to the northern Barossa area, and therefore requires significant energy to pump clean, safe drinking water across such large distances,” said SA Water’s Nicola Murphy While the total capacity of this new solar farm wasn’t provided, Ms. Murphy said it will generate approximately 5,224 megawatt hours of clean, green energy annually. There’s more solar energy to come for this section of pipeline, with a further 16,000 panels currently being connected at the first pump station.

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Indigenous lands can be ground zero for a wind energy boom

Article | May 19, 2021

It all started about four years ago, when SUVs and pickup trucks drove uninvited onto their lands, remembers Olimpia Palmar, a member of the Indigenous Wayúu peoples, who historically have occupied the La Guajira desert in northern Colombia and Venezuela. "We started seeing these arijunas [Wayuúunaiki for non-native peoples] wearing construction helmets and boots and vests, getting out of the cars, checking the desert, and then leaving," she recalls. Word soon began circulating across the Guajira Peninsula, from the rancherías — the community’s rural settlements — to the few urban centers: The arijunas were offering money to those who would let them plant tall, slim towers on their lands to measure the wind. On La Guajira’s dusty earth, where few things grow, towers began to sprout. By 2019, at least 30 wind-measuring towers had risen on Wayúu land, according to a report by Indepaz, a nonprofit research center.

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Why Renewable Energy is Important

Article | March 11, 2020

Renewable energy is here to stay. It’s becoming a much larger part of the United States’ total energy production, and it supports a more diverse energy network to give customers control over how their energy is produced. However, the importance behind this relatively new way to produce energy doesn’t stop there. Below are some of the most impactful areas renewable energy supports, specifically our infrastructure, economy, and environment, and how City Electric Supply is expanding into this growing market.

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