COVID-19 and its initial impact on the energy sector

| March 26, 2020

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As we continue to face an unprecedented global health crisis, our Head of Smart Generation Sales, Angus Widdowson looks at the initial impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the UK energy sector. With the UK on lockdown, many businesses closing and the majority of Britain’s workforce now working from home, COVID-19 is causing major economic disruption. It was covered in our Informer newsletter earlier this week that the growth in renewable generation in the UK gives us more resilience to tackle the challenges of COVID-19. Whilst the supply chain currently remains strong, as this pandemic continues, we are likely to see resource strain on operation and maintenance contractors. We expect naturally fuelled (wind, solar and hydro) plants to be more resilient than fuelled plant, given the lower risk to technical outages vs fuelled plant. Also, with renewable sites being dispersed across the country, we expect single point failures to have a lesser impact overall vs large thermal power generation. At this stage it’s unclear to see how COVID-19 will affect the development of new renewable projects but we are likely to see delays in the deployment of new wind and solar projects.

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