Energy Consumption By State

| February 27, 2017

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Most people agree: Performance reviews suck, especially when you’re forced to look at your numbers in comparison to coworkers’. But there’s no question that knowing how you rank compared to your office nemesis definitely whips you into shape. We think that’s what Good is getting at with Transparency: America’s Appetite for Energy, an infographic that compares energy consumption by state, providing some rather embarrassing information about the environmental impact of some of our home states

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SunShare

SunShare is one of the nation’s first and largest community solar companies. In 2011, SunShare helped redefine how people access solar energy by installing panels in nearby fields rather than on rooftops. Subscribers commit to a portion of the energy produced by the solar gardens, which in turn supplements their utility provider’s grid with clean, renewable energy.

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Spotlight

SunShare

SunShare is one of the nation’s first and largest community solar companies. In 2011, SunShare helped redefine how people access solar energy by installing panels in nearby fields rather than on rooftops. Subscribers commit to a portion of the energy produced by the solar gardens, which in turn supplements their utility provider’s grid with clean, renewable energy.

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