Offshore wind is blowing harder

June 6, 2019

Is offshore wind power getting ready to take off in the U.S.? Well, not quite yet, but things appear to be heating up. Much is still uncertain, but projects are moving forward, albeit slowly. The East Coast between southern New England and the Carolinas is attractive to developers of offshore energy because it has consistent year-round wind close to major cities such as Boston and New York. After Deepwater Wind and its five-turbine, 30-MW Block Island Wind Farm off Rhode Island went online in 2016, several federal leases were awarded. That same year, Equinor (then known as Statoil) won an 80,000-acre lease for its Empire Wind project in New York, and two years later companies bid almost double what Equinor spent per acre to secure three more leases south of Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., in December 2018. “I think what you’ll see with these leases in place is tremendous acceleration down to Virginia,” said James Bennett, who heads BOEM’s renewable energy program. In U.S. waters, offshore wind developers still face hurdles of finding enough heavy-lift construction vessels and physical space in U.S. ports to accommodate the next generation of giant wind turbines. But as our July cover story on offshore wind due out later this month says, U.S. shipbuilders and others are gearing up for offshore wind.

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Alectro, LLC

Our mission at Alectro is to accelerate the transition to renewable energy by designing and implementing large-scale solar projects. Economies of scale enhance the cost competitiveness of utility projects versus residential arrays. However, traditional plants utilize large swaths of habitable land which generates unnecessarily high costs, both economically and environmentally. Alectro's unique design and value proposition combine the best elements of residential and utility-scale projects to create the optimal solar solution.

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SOLAR+STORAGE

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ENERGY

Indigenous lands can be ground zero for a wind energy boom

Article | May 19, 2021

It all started about four years ago, when SUVs and pickup trucks drove uninvited onto their lands, remembers Olimpia Palmar, a member of the Indigenous Wayúu peoples, who historically have occupied the La Guajira desert in northern Colombia and Venezuela. "We started seeing these arijunas [Wayuúunaiki for non-native peoples] wearing construction helmets and boots and vests, getting out of the cars, checking the desert, and then leaving," she recalls. Word soon began circulating across the Guajira Peninsula, from the rancherías — the community’s rural settlements — to the few urban centers: The arijunas were offering money to those who would let them plant tall, slim towers on their lands to measure the wind. On La Guajira’s dusty earth, where few things grow, towers began to sprout. By 2019, at least 30 wind-measuring towers had risen on Wayúu land, according to a report by Indepaz, a nonprofit research center.

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SOLAR+STORAGE

ClearVue Solar Glass Greenhouse Officially Opened

Article | April 20, 2021

A high-tech greenhouse comprised mainly of solar glass generating electricity to help run it was officially opened yesterday in Western Australia. ClearVue Technologies Limited’s solar glass involves a nanoparticle interlayer and spectral-selective coating on the rear external surface that enables 70% of natural light to pass through while redirecting infrared and UV light converted to infrared to the edge where it is harvested by solar cells. ClearVue says each 1m2 of its window product is currently rated to generate 30 watts-peak of electric power, but also mentions a new-generation product with the proven ability to generate 40 watts peak per m2 to be available sometime this year.

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Spotlight

Alectro, LLC

Our mission at Alectro is to accelerate the transition to renewable energy by designing and implementing large-scale solar projects. Economies of scale enhance the cost competitiveness of utility projects versus residential arrays. However, traditional plants utilize large swaths of habitable land which generates unnecessarily high costs, both economically and environmentally. Alectro's unique design and value proposition combine the best elements of residential and utility-scale projects to create the optimal solar solution.

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