These solar-charged electric vehicles could change the world

| March 25, 2020

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With people working from home and generally staying in spring 2020, publications around the world have reported on a significant decrease in air pollution. Wouldn't it be great if we could keep emissions low, even after the threat of Covid-19 has dissipated? One company is trying to make that happen. Earlier this week, The New York Times reported that traffic and air pollution have plummeted as cities shut down due to the coronavirus. While there are no silver-linings to the COVID-19 pandemic, our response to this crisis shows that we are capable of abrupt changes when the situation necessitates them. Perhaps we can even reverse climate change. A key factor in bringing this change will be altering the way we commute. One company, Aptera Motors, is trying to make this happen with solar-charged electric vehicles.

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ACCIONA

Leaders in infrastructure (construction, water treatment, etc.) and renewable energy (wind, solar photovoltaic, etc.) from sustainability and innovation. Our offer covers the whole value chain, from design and construction to operation and maintenance. With a presence in more than 30 countries, the Group develops its business activities based on the desire to contribute to economic and social development in the communities in which it operates.

OTHER ARTICLES

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Which Solar Panels are the Most Efficient?

Article | February 14, 2020

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The Key to Unlocking 100% Renewables

Article | February 27, 2020

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ACCIONA

Leaders in infrastructure (construction, water treatment, etc.) and renewable energy (wind, solar photovoltaic, etc.) from sustainability and innovation. Our offer covers the whole value chain, from design and construction to operation and maintenance. With a presence in more than 30 countries, the Group develops its business activities based on the desire to contribute to economic and social development in the communities in which it operates.

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