What is community solar and is it better than installing solar panels on your home?

| February 24, 2020

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The U.S. reached a monumental 2 million solar installations in 2019. As more people look to save money through solar energy, many different options for doing so are becoming available. The U.S. Department of Energy defines community solar as “a solar-electric system that… provides power and/or financial benefit to… multiple community members.” These voluntary programs allow community residents to enjoy the perks of solar power without the large initial investment. The solar panels and related equipment are set up in a central location, so residents don’t need to buy and install equipment on their personal properties. The power produced by these projects is then shared by a community, and the hardware is either owned by the community itself or by a third party (i.e. Jaton’s community solar projects in California).

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ACCIONA

Leaders in infrastructure (construction, water treatment, etc.) and renewable energy (wind, solar photovoltaic, etc.) from sustainability and innovation. Our offer covers the whole value chain, from design and construction to operation and maintenance. With a presence in more than 30 countries, the Group develops its business activities based on the desire to contribute to economic and social development in the communities in which it operates.

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Recognizing and solving challenges in renewable energy land usage

Article | February 14, 2020

As anyone familiar with the saga of the Spotsylvania solar project knows, an inherent difficulty in developing renewable energy projects comes in finding the right project location, both in terms of size and siting. This is one of the topics analyzed in a new report released by The Brookings Institute: “Renewables, land use, and local opposition in the United States.” It’s a hard fact that renewable generation uses more land than fossil fuel systems, with solar having slightly lower median land use than both on- and offshore-wind, despite a large variance in total land density values. While this presents an issue for renewable developers, the silver lining is that renewable energy can be sustained indefinitely on the same land base, while mines and wells will eventually run out. As a solution, the study recommends greater development on brownfields, as well as floating PV, though the authors do recognize the capped potential of floating PV at around 10% of current U.S. electricity generation.

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Toyota Green Energy could focus on offshore wind for hydrogen

Article | April 9, 2020

The world’s largest automotive company, Toyota, has announced a joint venture to enter the renewable power generation industry, setting up Toyota Green Energy in its home country of Japan. While initially this will focus on powering the company’s operations with clean electricity, the long-term could see the venture shift its focus towards the production of green hydrogen for use in Toyota’s fuel-cell vehicles. Last Friday, Toyota Motor Corporation announced an agreement with Chubu Electric Power and Toyota Tsusho Corporation to establish their new partnership in July, with the purpose of obtaining and managing renewable energy resources in Japan to power the operations of the Toyota Group.

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How heat can be used to store renewable energy

Article | February 25, 2020

The effect that fossil fuels are having on the climate emergency is driving an international push to use low-carbon sources of energy. At the moment, the best options for producing low-carbon energy on a large scale are wind and solar power. But despite improvements over the last few years to both their performance and cost, a significant problem remains: the wind doesn’t always blow, and the sun doesn’t always shine. A power grid that relies on these fluctuating sources struggles to constantly match supply and demand, and so renewable energy sometimes goes to waste because it��s not produced when needed.

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What does Covid-19 mean for Renewable Energy?

Article | April 15, 2020

Covid-19. It’s everywhere, and it’s probably the reason that your food cupboards are unusually more stocked than usual, or the fact that you’re likely reading this blog from the confines of your own home, as opposed to at your office or during your daily commute. But, despite the impact to business, economies, daily life and public health, there’s one bittersweet development which we can all take away from the outbreak – and that’s the considerable reduction of global CO2 emissions, and a resurgence of hope that it is fully possible for us to slow the onset of climate change and preserve our planet for future generations.

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ACCIONA

Leaders in infrastructure (construction, water treatment, etc.) and renewable energy (wind, solar photovoltaic, etc.) from sustainability and innovation. Our offer covers the whole value chain, from design and construction to operation and maintenance. With a presence in more than 30 countries, the Group develops its business activities based on the desire to contribute to economic and social development in the communities in which it operates.

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