Why the Tesla Battery Isn't a Renewable Energy Gamechanger

| November 28, 2019

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Elon Musk announced that Tesla would be releasing a battery to help solar users store their excess solar energy, giving them access to energy on demand. It's being hailed as revolutionary technology that's going to change the face of renewables. Unfortunately, once you push past the hype, this technology isn't the panacea solution it's being promoted as. The first reason the battery is problematic is based on simple issues with lithium ion battery technology. Batteries, in general, are very inefficient and costly. When you discharge and charge a battery, you're losing energy. With the Tesla battery, this would result in approximately 20% daily energy loss when it's in use. In addition, Tesla is saying that it would cost 2 cents per kilowatt hour to use the battery to do load shifting and storage.

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OTHER ARTICLES

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Leaders in infrastructure (construction, water treatment, etc.) and renewable energy (wind, solar photovoltaic, etc.) from sustainability and innovation. Our offer covers the whole value chain, from design and construction to operation and maintenance. With a presence in more than 30 countries, the Group develops its business activities based on the desire to contribute to economic and social development in the communities in which it operates.

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