U.S. should lead the 'clean energy revolution' -- and learn from state innovations

In my state, you don’t have to tell our farmers about climate change — they look out at rain-soaked fields and see the changing weather patterns. The rising frequency of “intense” rainstorms in Minnesota is also overwhelming infrastructure in riverfront communities. Climate change is real. It is caused by humans, and it’s damaging to our health, our families and our environment. If we don’t take aggressive action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, it will get worse. We know this because that’s what science tells us. We need to get beyond science denial so that we can move on to the important question: What are we going to do about it? Inaction is not acceptable. A recent report concluded that, under “business as usual” policies, climate change will likely reduce annual U.S. per capita GDP 4 percent by 2050 and more than 10 percent by 2100. In Minnesota, as is the case almost everywhere else, the brunt of the climate change burden will be borne by low-income communities.

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